EPS launches digital comic book

EPS launches digital comic book
02-Apr-2014

“Alex Decoteau!” Alex stepped forward at the sound of his name. The small crowd of family members and well-wishers who came to witness the swearing-in of the city’s newest police officers, clapped in appreciation.

One hundred and thirteen years ago, Alex Decoteau made Canadian policing history.

The young Metis man from Saskatchewan moved to Edmonton in 1909 to work in his brother-in-law’s machine shop. Two years later, Alex joined the Edmonton Police Department, becoming the first Aboriginal police officer in Canada.

Now, Alex’s life story is the subject of LEGACY OF HEROES, a digital comic produced by the Edmonton Police Service.

[Read More]

 

Read the Legacy of Heroes digital Comic.

 

Source: Edmonton Police Service

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Turtle Island Voices CANADA – Levelled Book Series: Grade 1 – 8

Turtle Island Voices – Levelled Book Series: Grade 1 – 8

The stories within Turtle Island Voices are told in many parts of Canada. “Turtle Island” refers to the continent of North America, based on the creation stories of many Aboriginal peoples. Though the stories vary, many tell of the continent being created on the back of a great turtle.

Integrating Turtle Island Voices into the classroom not only helps to foster a sense of identity among Aboriginal students, but it also enriches all students with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives. Turtle Island Voices honours the histories, cultures, worldviews, and knowledge of Canada’s Aboriginal communities with exciting stories, information, and graphics that will pique students’ interest in learning about Aboriginal peoples and cultures.

Complete with Teacher Guides

Turtle Island Voices CANADA – Home.

Aboriginal Literatures in Canada – Teacher’s Guide

Authors: Renate Eigenbrod, Georgina Kakegamic and Josias Fiddler
Published By: curriculum.org
Grade Level: 9 -12
Excerpt:Aboriginal Literatures in Canada: A Teacher’s Resource Guide serves a double purpose: to encourage the teaching of Aboriginal literature in English high school curricula across the country because Aboriginal students deserve to be taught texts they can relate to and, because non-Aboriginal students should be educated about Aboriginal culture, history and contemporary life through the richness of Aboriginal writing with its innovative uses of the English language.

view the Resource Guide.

~Source: Curriculum.org

Alberta Cree author Larry Loyie – Children’s Books and more

.First Nations Writer

Award-winning Cree author Larry Loyie and his touring partner Constance Brissenden are now booking school visits, talks, writing workshops and so on for 2012.

Larry’s new book

The Moon Speaks Cree, A Winter Adventure (Theytus) will be available in August 2012. The illustrations by Heather D. Holmlund combined with Larry Loyie’s beautiful text promise to make this a must-have illustrated family-reading book.

Being a children’s book author has many perks … from meeting wonderful students of all ages to travelling to new (sometimes remote) and beautiful places.

Also see the Residential School section on his website.

Aboriginal Family Literacy – Library of Books

Aboriginal Family Literacy Centre at BCAAFC

The Aboriginal Family Literacy Initiative is a project developed by the BCAAFC which aims to contribute to increased literacy among Aboriginal families in BC through the creation of a movement which will promote, support, and empower Aboriginal Family Literacy.

Family Literacy Library.

SAY Magazine

SAY Magazine.
The largest national lifestyle magazine for and about about Native people – the largest growing demographic in North America, SAY Magazine, now in our tenth year, has grown to include four regular issues plus annual Best Practice in Economic Development and University College and University Guide for Native Students editions.